Collaborative divorce has been greatly discussed in recent months. Its new-found popularity is likely in part because these sorts of cases tend to be less contentious than divorce matters litigated in court. However, the process will prove unsuccessful if all parties are not committed to making it work.

Being collaborative during a divorce is difficult. Individuals are often blind to their own faults. They may conclude that their actions are collaborative in nature while the evidence shows otherwise.

Collaborative divorce may not be well-suited for everyone. But even in these circumstances the process can prove successful if the two spouses are determined to make it work and remain positive about the process. As in any divorce matter, the needs of the children of a couple must be handled carefully. In the collaborative divorce process this could mean bringing in a child specialist to address certain child issues.

To be successful the collaborative divorce process requires understanding on the part of both parties, a willingness to openly communicate with each other, and an environment where respect and trust can be fostered. The attorneys involved in the process will have to prepare their clients for such an environment.

Divorce is never easy under any circumstance. Even in a collaborative divorce we are dealing with a stressful situation. Still, the process can prove to be favorable even if it starts off with a series of unhappy circumstances. The goal is to work towards a constructive and amiable conclusion to the divorce. At the same time we need to make certain that one’s interests are protected.

Source: Huffington Post, “What Is Required to Make Collaborative Divorce Truly Collaborative?” Mark Baer, June 3, 2014